Pretentious and Poor

Can I steal you for a minute?   Twenty-One. Neurotic. French Fry Connoisseur. Avid Wearer of Sweaters. Naturally Adept Cuddler. Dedicated Coffee Drinker. Spirited Television Watcher. Aspiring Writer/Actress. Future Cat Lady. Activist. INTJ.  motherfucking snakes on this motherfucking plane
SLYTHERIN
{ wear }

twofishies:

lightspeedsound:

all-the-fangirl-feels:

#remember how this movie took female stereotypes and crushed them into a million pieces

casual reminder that Elle Woods scored a 179 on the LSAT, which is one point shy of a perfect score.

Casual reminder that Whatshisface here had family connections and was a legacy and shit, whereas Elle Woods came out of nowhere.

casual reminder that Elle Woods actually had an amazing background in real life issues that people dismissed as unimportant but managed to not only learn the law, but learned how to apply the law.

Casual reminder that Elle Woods used her lawyer skills to save a woman from an abusive relationship and also save another woman from trumped up murder charges and basically what I’m saying is you go, girl, go get ‘em Elle Woods, thank you for this movie.

what’s fantastic about this movie is that it’s not that fucked up brand of feminism where the girls who arent like other girls and sip tea and read hemingway look down on the blonde party sluts. the message of the movie is like, you can be blonde and attractive AND enjoy stuff like shopping and partying and you can still be smart and kick ass!!!

(Source: fifthharmony, via benkaling)

— 3 days ago with 294109 notes
#legally blonde  #flawless 
imwithkanye:

Elaine Stritch, Tart-Tongued Broadway Actress and Singer, Is Dead at 89 | NYT
Plainspoken, egalitarian, impatient with fools and foolishness, and admittedly fond of cigarettes, alcohol and late nights — she finally gave up smoking and drinking in her 60s — though she took it up again — Ms. Stritch might be the only actor to work as a bartender after starring on Broadway, and she was completely unabashed about her good-time-girl attitude.
“I’m not a bit opposed to your mentioning in this article that Frieda Fun here has had a reputation in the theater, for the past five or six years, for drinking,” she said to a reporter for The New York Times in 1968. “I drink and I love to drink, and it’s part of my life.”
[more]

imwithkanye:

Elaine Stritch, Tart-Tongued Broadway Actress and Singer, Is Dead at 89 | NYT

Plainspoken, egalitarian, impatient with fools and foolishness, and admittedly fond of cigarettes, alcohol and late nights — she finally gave up smoking and drinking in her 60s — though she took it up again — Ms. Stritch might be the only actor to work as a bartender after starring on Broadway, and she was completely unabashed about her good-time-girl attitude.

“I’m not a bit opposed to your mentioning in this article that Frieda Fun here has had a reputation in the theater, for the past five or six years, for drinking,” she said to a reporter for The New York Times in 1968. “I drink and I love to drink, and it’s part of my life.”

[more]

— 1 week ago with 1783 notes
#this is devastating  #elaine stritch  #fine under: formative influences 
So uhhh…

After years of denying any interest, I’ve decided to watch Lost.

10 minutes into the Pilot, I’m already a goner. This may be worse than the time I decided to watch The Vampire Diaries. And we all remember that, right?

— 1 week ago with 1 note
#about me  #my life  #lost 

swanjolras:

okay, most of what i do re: harry potter is criticism, and hp is flawed in such a number of ways, but sometimes i just sit here and

i mean, you all have a comprehension of just how drastically harry potter changed literature, yeah? like. it revitalized it. it blew the literary scene apart. the new york times had to create a separate bestseller’s list for children’s lit just because harry potter existed. harry potter changed reading.

so many people on tumblr were born in the ’90s. when the first book came out, most of us couldn’t read. but we grew up in a world where everyone, everyone, everyone was reading harry potter, no matter how old they were; we grew up in a world where the most popular story in the entire world was a fantasy children’s book.

it’s sort of difficult to grasp, sometimes, the extent to which harry potter is not just a book. the extent to which what is basically a series of fun, interesting, and fairly good novels is such an enormous, enormous part of our lives, a cultural touchstone, a truly universal reference point, something so many people have shaped their lives around, a foundation for all of the stories we would read and watch for the rest of our lives— for so many of us, the first books we ever loved

the extent to which so many of us can’t call ourselves “fans” of harry potter, because it would like being a “fan” of, like, having lungs.

it’s not even about liking it or disliking it. it’s just a part of us.

(via rjlupins)

— 1 week ago with 6727 notes
#THIS IS EVERYTHING  #hogwarts will always be there to welcome you home  #harry potter  #literature 

katieloveslace:

Explain plz. In detail and at length.

As you wish!

So two kind of starting points for my musings:

1) The idea of the “mediatization of religion” is pretty much what it sounds like - that religion adapts itself to media techniques. This can be seen with televangelists in the 1980s and with the rise of social media use by churches now. But it also relates to the way religion - shaped by the media - has become more personal, individualized and commercial. You pick and choose what you want to be your religion - from traditional sources like church, from new agey/self helpy type stuff, and I would argue also from popular culture. 

2) This theory (the mediatization of religion one) recognizes something called “banal religion,” which is basically superstitions, practices, emotions, etc. that reference the spiritual/supernatural but aren’t formal or institutional in the same way as typical religion. An example might be knocking on wood to avoid jinxing something.

OK SO that was a long starting point sorry. The gist is that religious content gets into and is shaped by the media, that we pick and choose from it because it’s highly individualizable, and that these things can be expressed in sort of day-to-day beliefs, practices, etc. and are still worth calling religious.

So Harry Potter is full of religious themes, right? Resurrection, the redeeming power of love, life after death.

The houses aren’t so religious in that sense, but they’re definitely about morality, and I think it’s FASCINATING that they’ve given us (people who grew up with the books) a whole new language in which to talk about morality. Those endless meta debates about whether slytherins are evil or just misunderstood are debates about the morality of ambition, pride and self-preservation, which is some pretty deep stuff. Same with the debates about Hufflepuff, or scoffing at Gryffindor for being reckless. 

But obviously for people who are attached to the books, these debates aren’t purely intellectual - they have to do with our own house affiliations, the set of moral values we’ve taken from this book and sort of claimed as our own. When I say I’m a Hufflepuff, that instantly says quite a lot about me to anyone who knows the books, and it also reflects quite a bit of thought on my part about my identity and morality. This isn’t religious in the same way as the more soul-and-afterlife parts of the series, but I would argue that it could also be seen as a kind of “banal religion” - this random thing out of a book has been absorbed into my own understanding of morality, and can be used to signal that to other people and have conversations about it, even alongside other sources of morality like those from my church. 

In the religious content of Harry Potter, the houses are more like the proverbs than the gospels - less miracles, more talk about what is morality and how to do it. It’d be fair to argue that there’s nothing spiritual about the Hogwarts houses, so they don’t count as “banal religion.” I think they do though, for how strongly and sometimes emotionally people identify with them as a way of making sense of their moral universes alongside other sources. 

(via droo216)

— 1 week ago with 74 notes
#YES ALL OVER THIS  #harry potter  #morality  #slytherin life